TUCAS Fact of the ... 404—Time range not found

Here, we will collect all the previous “TUCAS Facts” we featured before. “TUCAS Facts” are regularly presented funny and/or interesting facts we came across somewhere – on occasion maybe even a dad-joke-y quote (not to name names but probably by Florenz).

TUCAS Fact #7:
Florian found another quite curious study about animals: In 1995, scientists found that pigeons can learn to distinguish paintings by Picasso or Monet.

TUCAS Fact #6:
Potoooooooo (pronounced Pot-eight-ohs, alternate spellings Pot-8-Os or variations thereof) is the name of an 18th-century racehorse who won over 30 races. The most common explanation of the – slightly unusual – name cites a misunderstanding when naming the colt: The breeder wanted to name it “Potato” and told a stable boy to write the name on a feed bin.

TUCAS Fact #5: In honor of the 25th anniversary of the start of the serialisation of “One Piece“, we dedicate this fact to the magnum opus of Eiichiro Oda:
A gene of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster – the Drosophila Baramicin polypeptide gene (presented in this study) – is (partly) named after a character of Oda’s manga, “Buggy, the Clown” (as mentioned in the acknowledgement of the study). Having eaten the “Bara Bara no Mi” (the “Chop Chop Fruit”) and thus gaining superpowers, Buggy can cleave his body in any way he wants – this inspired the name for the gene, which “encodes a precursor protein cleaved into multiple peptides (…)”.

TUCAS Fact #4:
The 65.537-gon is constructible – meaning it can be constructed using only a compass and an unmarked straightedge. That fact had been proven by Gauss by 1801; however, there are instructions to conduct said construction! They were given by Johann Gustav Hermes in 1894, are 221 pages long and took more than 10 years to complete. Today, they are stored at the University of Göttingen, Germany.

TUCAS Fact #3: To round out our special “octopus week”, we present one last fact about octop… the octopus:
The octopus was mentioned by Aristotle in his History of Animals (more specifically in Part 37 of Book IX) written in the 4th century B.C., where he says the following: “The octopus is a stupid creature, for it will approach a man’s hand if it be lowered in the water; but it is neat and thrifty in its habits: that is, it lays up stores in its nest, and, after eating up all that is eatable, it ejects the shells and sheaths of crabs and shell-fish, and the skeletons of little fishes.

TUCAS Fact #2: Today’s fact concerns multiple units of octopus:
The question which of the three (3!) possible plurals is correct, is a hotly debated one (see, e. g., here or here). It boils down to how you construct a plural for an originally Greek word that arrived in English via (New) Latin: Do you use Greek, Latin, or English rules? While dictionaries usually give octopuses as most common one and mention the latin-based octopi, the plural relating to the Greek roots – octopodes – is mainly omitted. For the record, the favorite version of Thomas – our resident stickler for grammar – is withouth a doubt octopodes.

TUCAS Fact #1:
To start us off, Florian came across a study that found that octopuses – while generally fairly asocial and solitary – under the influence of MDMA (also known as Ecstasy) exhibit increased prosocial behaviour.

Bonus Fact #0:
We could not agree on the periodicity of this new rubric, so we included a funny (?) joke instead.

September 2022

TUCAS Fact #7:
Florian found another quite curious study about animals: In 1995, scientists found that pigeons can learn to distinguish paintings by Picasso or Monet.

August 2022

TUCAS Fact #6:
Potoooooooo (pronounced Pot-eight-ohs, alternate spellings Pot-8-Os or variations thereof) is the name of an 18th-century racehorse who won over 30 races. The most common explanation of the – slightly unusual – name cites a misunderstanding when naming the colt: The breeder wanted to name it “Potato” and told a stable boy to write the name on a feed bin.

TUCAS Fact #5: In honor of the 25th anniversary of the start of the serialisation of “One Piece“, we dedicate this fact to the magnum opus of Eiichiro Oda:
A gene of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster – the Drosophila Baramicin polypeptide gene (presented in this study) – is (partly) named after a character of Oda’s manga, “Buggy, the Clown” (as mentioned in the acknowledgement of the study). Having eaten the “Bara Bara no Mi” (the “Chop Chop Fruit”) and thus gaining superpowers, Buggy can cleave his body in any way he wants – this inspired the name for the gene, which “encodes a precursor protein cleaved into multiple peptides (…)”.

TUCAS Fact #4:
The 65.537-gon is constructible – meaning it can be constructed using only a compass and an unmarked straightedge. That fact had been proven by Gauss by 1801; however, there are instructions to conduct said construction! They were given by Johann Gustav Hermes in 1894, are 221 pages long and took more than 10 years to complete. Today, they are stored at the University of Göttingen, Germany.

TUCAS Fact #3: To round out our special “octopus week”, we present one last fact about octop… the octopus:
The octopus was mentioned by Aristotle in his History of Animals (more specifically in Part 37 of Book IX) written in the 4th century B.C., where he says the following: “The octopus is a stupid creature, for it will approach a man’s hand if it be lowered in the water; but it is neat and thrifty in its habits: that is, it lays up stores in its nest, and, after eating up all that is eatable, it ejects the shells and sheaths of crabs and shell-fish, and the skeletons of little fishes.

TUCAS Fact #2: Today’s fact concerns multiple units of octopus:
The question which of the three (3!) possible plurals is correct, is a hotly debated one (see, e. g., here or here). It boils down to how you construct a plural for an originally Greek word that arrived in English via (New) Latin: Do you use Greek, Latin, or English rules? While dictionaries usually give octopuses as most common one and mention the latin-based octopi, the plural relating to the Greek roots – octopodes – is mainly omitted. For the record, the favorite version of Thomas – our resident stickler for grammar – is withouth a doubt octopodes.

TUCAS Fact #1:
To start us off, Florian came across a study that found that octopuses – while generally fairly asocial and solitary – under the influence of MDMA (also known as Ecstasy) exhibit increased prosocial behaviour.

Bonus Fact #0:
We could not agree on the periodicity of this new rubric, so we included a funny (?) joke instead.